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The 58th Ferrisburgh Christmas Bird Count took place on Saturday December 16th. It was a fine day for winter birding with temperatures in the mid-20s. Gusts on the lake could get cold, but overall the wind was not too ferocious. The ground sported a light snow cover but little to no precipitation fell during the day. Thirteen teams spent a cumulative 162 hours in the field and received assistance from an additional three feeder watchers. Five teams spent an additional 16 hours owling. As far as birding, overall the numbers were average. We found 78 species plus one count week which is our 10-year average, and our total of 23,365 birds counted is but 5% above the 10-year average. Read the rest of this entry »

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This year 39 field birders and 19 observers at feeders located and identified 15,963 birds of 72 species during our Middlebury Christmas Bird Count on Sunday, December 17th.

We survey a 15-mile-diameter count circle centered on the Lemon Fair in eastern Bridport and covering from the A & W Root Beer stand on the east to New York State on the west and from Snake Mt. on the north to Richville Dam on the south.  The Middlebury count is one of over 1,800 held throughout North and Central America.  Owling teams started the day in the predawn blackness.  Field birders met them at 6 AM for breakfast and an organizational meeting at Rosie’s Restaurant.  After breakfast, field birders headed out to their assigned territories. Read the rest of this entry »

 

Do you live in or near one of the circles in the map above? If so, you should consider participating in the Christmas Bird Count. One of the oldest, continuously running, citizen science projects, the CBC has accumulated over a century’s worth of data on the occurrence of wintering birds. There are two ways to participate, as a field observer Read the rest of this entry »

This year 42 field birders and 13 observers at feeders located and identified 24,073 birds of 72 species in during our Middlebury Christmas Bird Count on Sunday, December 18th.  

Water bodies within our count circle had remained open through the Thursday before the count when temperatures dropped and most still water froze over.  Access to water allows ducks, geese, eagles, herons, kingfishers, and other water-related birds to continue to find food in the Lake Champlain basin.  Despite the freeze, field teams found 13 of the 44 water-related species that we have located over the 28 years of the count.  Ducks and geese were identified while sitting in fields, flying overhead, and occasionally sitting on the ice.  In addition, two Great Blue herons were found near small patches of remaining open water.  The team of Ian Worley, Ethan Fenn, and Richard Harlow identified a flock of 16 Black scoters flying south over the icy lake.  This is the first time this species has been identified during our count, though it is irregularly seen during X-mas counts held further north of us in the open waters of Lake Champlain.  A new record of 15 Bald eagles were counted in our circle as well.  Some of these may have been our own local eagles that are now returning to nest in Addison County for the first time in decades. Read the rest of this entry »

The 57th Ferrisburgh Christmas Bird Count took place on Saturday December 17th. Our field teams fought through a snowy morning, but the afternoon was clear. Temperatures sat in the high teens and twenties through the day. The lake was mostly open, but inland waters and Otter Creek were mostly frozen. Thirty-seven people in 12 field teams spent 132 hours searching for birds. Their efforts were supplemented by three feeder watchers.  All together the teams came up with 16,927 birds of 74 species with three additional count week species. Over the last ten years we have averaged 78 species and just over 22,000 birds. Read the rest of this entry »

Do you live in or near one of the circles in the map above? If so, you should consider participating in the Christmas Bird Count. One of the oldest, continuously running, citizen science projects, the CBC has accumulated over a century’s worth of data on the occurrence of wintering birds. This data was played a key role in National Audubon Society’s recent Climate Report. There are two ways to participate, as a field observer spending an entire day scouring a territory for birds, or if you Read the rest of this entry »

The 56th Ferrisburgh Christmas Bird Count took place on Saturday December 19th in fine weather. Temperatures were above freezing, there was no precipitation, a moderate but not awful wind. Fifty-one people in 12 field teams spent 178.5 hours searching for birds. Their efforts were supplemented by five feeder watchers.  Conditions were good for birding. We were just missing birds.  Read the rest of this entry »

This year 43 field birders and 11 observers at feeders located and identified 23,021 birds of 74 species during our Middlebury Christmas Bird Count on Sunday, December 20th.   Read the rest of this entry »

Do you live in or near one of the circles in the map above? If so, you should consider participating in the Christmas Bird Count. One of the oldest, continuously running, citizen science projects, the CBC has accumulated over a century’s worth of data on the occurrence of wintering birds. This data was played a key role in National Audubon Society’s recent Climate Report. There are two ways to participate, as a field observer spending an entire day scouring a territory for birds, or if you Read the rest of this entry »

Happy New Year. Here is a summary of the results from the 55th Ferrisburgh Christmas Bird Count that took place on December 20, 2014. We had 47 field participants and 4 feeder watchers who spent a collective 150 ¼ hours counting birds in our area, with an additional 15 ¾ hours of owling effort. Weather for the count was seasonal with very little wind and no precipitation. Temperatures ranged from the low teens to high twenties through the day, and Read the rest of this entry »

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